Art & The Web

MOWA | Forum: Art & The Web
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By hoon park on Monday, November 5, 2001 - 01:32 am:

> I am web artist Hoon Park in South Korea.
> Go with seeing well good works.
> Be healthy and happy.
> It was good time.
> Good-bye ..
> http://www.xyzph.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By Catherine on Sunday, November 4, 2001 - 08:59 am:

I am doing a Personal Study as part of my Art A - Level, into "the Web as a new Medium and Showcase for Art?" To co-incide with the title I am displaying it in the form of a website, and need as much input from anyone out there of your opinions on the matter!
I am particularly looking at using online galleries as a means to display artist's work, and how different - (better/ worse) it is to seeing art "in the flesh"

Please mail me with your views and ideas, and any useful sites/ resources to consider!
Thanx

Catherine


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By Namstradamus on Tuesday, September 18, 2001 - 02:21 pm:

Hi people,
I'm a student and I have to do a talk at school and I've chosen Web-Art as my subject. Can anyone suggest a website about Web-art? I know what it looks like:) I wanna know all about it; who, what, when, why, where etc.
Please email the link to my email cos I need it as soon as possible and I don't think I have time to check out this page that often.

Thanks!
Nam, The Netherlands.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By Melinda on Monday, July 30, 2001 - 07:20 pm:

Lots of web art!

UMPHENOUR PRODUCTIONS
www.umphenour.com

As a collaborator to this sight, I can say it contains some of the freshest work on the web. All the artists on this site are students, new to the art world, but the quality is top notch. This website features student work and is trying to create an online network of student artists. The communication of ideas from person to person is the most important part of the creative process. At Umphenour Productions, collaborators are working from around the globe.
Go to umphenour.com for new artwork everyweek, and check out the News section for archived artwork.
www.umphenour.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By duggie on Sunday, April 22, 2001 - 07:36 am:

DUGGIE FIELDS
www.duggiefields.com


featuring in BBC television Open University
season fall 2001 presented by Mariella
Frostrup

LESS IS LESS - MORE OR LESS

Duggie Fields's dayglo post-pop paintings are
instantly recognisable. Despite his concern
with the identity-dissolving impact of mass
media on the contemporary psyche, Fields
manages to sustain a coherent signature
style that is as flamboyantly dysfunctional as it
is cool and simple.
Applying overdriven colour and stripped down
cartoon-ish drawing to produce mutant
variations on classical poses and genres,
Fields' work scrambles categories, freaked
out and flatline, delirious and deadpan all at
once.
Combining elements from disparate cultural
and historical vocabularies, Fields' paintings
look like stained glass windows for some
cathedral of modern Media. The artist's manic
imagination throws up deranged icon
paintings, casual violence erupting out of ritual
and kitsch.
Promiscuous and dangerously volatile, Field's
multiverse is a place where ballroom dancing
and comic book mutilation intersect. Nothing
in Western culture is safe from Fields, for as
the artist argues in his 'MAXIMALism'
manifesto of 1995, digital media has rendered
history part of a continuous present.
Fields confronts us with the (sur)reality of an
infinitely malleable, perpetually mediated
world.
The new media of the digital age allow 'infinite
opportunities for new synthetic constructs',
writes Fields. 'We are of necessity the
Primitives of a New Sensibility, born in the
Virtual Age.' "
Fields graduated from Chelsea School of Art
in London in 1968. After Minimal, Conceptual
and Constructivist phases he arrived at a
more hard-edge post-Pop figuration. In 1983
the Shiseido Corporation in Tokyo created a
gallery specially for his show, and Fields and
his work were featured in a simultaneous
national television, magazine, billlboard and
subway advertising campaign.
He started working with digital media in the
late 1990's describing his work in progress as
Maximalist.

BEN SEYMOUR , BRITART.COM april 20001


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By Tommy on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 01:45 pm:

New images posted this week:
Digital Photo Collage
http://erg
ocise.com/tc/dpc.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By Sarika Ravindran on Wednesday, January 24, 2001 - 05:08 pm:

The University of Southern California, School of Fine Arts announces its second international festival of time-based media, Art In Motion II (AIM II) from Thursday- Saturday, February 15, 16, 17, 2001. Presented in collaboration with the Santa Monica Museum of Art, the three-day festival will address the theme of "The Vanishing Author?" in a juried exhibition and screening a symposium, and an educational outreach program. Time-based media includes, film, video, digital video, animation, sound pieces, CD Roms, websites, installations and performances. Entry is free and open to all. For more information visit us at: www.usc.edu/aim or contact us at: aim@usc.edu

Details on AIM II are as follows:


Event Schedule:

¡PSymposium ¡V ¡§The Vanishing Author?¡¨
Thursday, February 15, 2001
6.30-10.00pm
Gin D Wong. FAIA Conference Center
Harris Hall
Exposition Blvd. @Watt Way
USC University Park Campus,
Los Angeles, CA 90089
Symposium moderated by: Christiane Robbins - media artist and associate professor with the USC School of Fine Arts

¡PScreenings ¡V Films, videos, digital videos, animations
Friday February 16, 2001
11am-6pm
The Annenberg Auditorium
USC Annenberg School for Communication
Watt Way@ Helman Way
USC University Park Campus
Los Angeles CA 90089

¡PThe WebAd TV Art In Motion Exhibition
Includes, installations, games, websites CD-Roms, sound pieces.
Thursday-Friday-Saturday, February 16-18, 2001
11am ¡V6pm
Santa Monica Museum of Art
Bergamot Station
2525 Michigan Avenue, Bldg G1
Santa Monica
Phone: 310.586.6488

¡PReception and Award Ceremony
Saturday February 17, 2001
7.30-10pm
Santa Monica Museum of Art
Bergamot Station
2525 Michigan Avenue, Bldg G1
Santa Monica
Phone: 310.586.6488

Festival Co-sponsored by:

USC Annenberg School for Communication
Apple
USC Arts Initiative
California Arts Council
Intelefilm
USC Spectrum
SuperHappyBunny
WebADTV
www.dublab.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By Richard Winters on Saturday, December 9, 2000 - 04:23 pm:

Re:Web-art sites.
I have been collecting links for a while.
http://www.studio54.btinternet.co.uk/links.htm
From there try "Jodi index" and "divide by zero" for their quality works and linkage.
"Graphic design? even jesus had a logo!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By Ilia Anossov on Sunday, November 26, 2000 - 02:25 am:

Affresco ( In English usage, “fresco” ). Painting done on freshly laid wet plaster with pigments dissolved in lime water. As both dry they become completely integrated. Known as “true” fresco, this technique was most popular from the late thirteenth to the mid-sixteenth centuries.
The common assumption that all mural painting is fresco painting is an erroneous idea. It is true that one can in fact paint on fresh plaster, or intonaco, to make a painting in affresco or a fresco. In true fresco the artist must start applying his colors on the wet (or fresco) intonaco as soon as it has been prepared and laid on the wall. The colors can thus be absorbed by the wet plaster. When it dries and hardens, the colors become one with plaster.
Technically speaking the plaster does not “dry” but rather a chemical reaction occurs in which calcium carbonate is formed as a result of carbon dioxide from the air combining with the calcium hydrate in the wet plaster.


Please give us your feedback!
Modern Fresco Gallery & Cafe al Fresco -


WELCOME

Modern Fresco Gallery - Buon (true) Fresco technique, Fresco projects around the world directory, picture gallery.

JOIN the DISCUSSIONS
Cafe al Fresco - Discussion forum on Buon Fresco painting technique and workshop, visual and performing arts, gallery and museum exhibitions, tips and advice on art marketing from professional art agent, fresco documentary, online artist promotion and more.
you can go directly to the Cafe al Fresco by following this link:
http://www.truefresco.com/cgidir/dcforum/dcboard.cgi


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By Ilia Anossov on Sunday, November 26, 2000 - 02:24 am:

Affresco ( In English usage, “fresco” ). Painting done on freshly laid wet plaster with pigments dissolved in lime water. As both dry they become completely integrated. Known as “true” fresco, this technique was most popular from the late thirteenth to the mid-sixteenth centuries.
The common assumption that all mural painting is fresco painting is an erroneous idea. It is true that one can in fact paint on fresh plaster, or intonaco, to make a painting in affresco or a fresco. In true fresco the artist must start applying his colors on the wet (or fresco) intonaco as soon as it has been prepared and laid on the wall. The colors can thus be absorbed by the wet plaster. When it dries and hardens, the colors become one with plaster.
Technically speaking the plaster does not “dry” but rather a chemical reaction occurs in which calcium carbonate is formed as a result of carbon dioxide from the air combining with the calcium hydrate in the wet plaster.


Please give us your feedback!
Modern Fresco Gallery & Cafe al Fresco -


http://www.truefresco.com/animation2_portal.gif

Modern Fresco Gallery - Buon (true) Fresco technique, Fresco projects around the world directory, picture gallery.

http://www.truefresco.com/images/logo_forum_small.jpg
Cafe al Fresco - Discussion forum on Buon Fresco painting technique and workshop, visual and performing arts, gallery and museum exhibitions, tips and advice on art marketing from professional art agent, fresco documentary, online artist promotion and more.
you can go directly to the Cafe al Fresco by following this link:
http://www.truefresco.com/cgidir/dcforum/dcboard.cgi


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By Allison on Wednesday, October 25, 2000 - 07:45 pm:

What is the general understanding of traditional art?
How is technology changing the structure of art?
When will it stop?
How do artist feel about this change? Who are they?
Is art loosing its' authenticity?
Has technology opened the door to something even greater than we can imagen?
What are the pros and cons about art and technology?
Is technology too restricted for art?
Please visit me


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By Marie Thornby on Monday, October 23, 2000 - 05:25 am:

What do you consider to be the future of both web based and more 'traditional' forms of Museums/Galleries?
Is it not true that interaction gives a degree of control whilst hiding away the extent to which we are controlled?
What are your opinions on collection versus appropriation?
I would be most grateful for all views, perspectives and opinions - please get in touch!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By Estrella Moreno on Saturday, June 10, 2000 - 01:50 pm:

Try
http://martyn.bizland.com
for some interesting paintings...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By J Kessner on Sunday, April 23, 2000 - 09:49 am:

How will/do art museums use technology to enhance the live experience without being used by technology?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By Alex Raffi on Thursday, April 20, 2000 - 07:04 am:

computer art online:
foto - fractals - mindscapes - 3D painting
and more to come

http://www.infinito.it/utenti/tamerlan/
please visit me
Alex


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By Violet Parkhurst on Tuesday, April 18, 2000 - 01:12 pm:

If you are interested in a valuable information resource by a successful artist...for artists, Violet Parkhurst shares her knowledge and experience of getting started and succeeding in the art world with her monthly newsletter The Parkhurst Guide for Artists.
The newsletter includes topical articles with solutions to many of the questions that face artists today as well as provide a subscriber question and answer forum.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By ed palmer on Thursday, August 26, 1999 - 04:02 pm:

so when is the first structured webart movement going to take place?

technology: limit
web artists: voice path of technology

this is not a looped statement.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By kar138 on Friday, September 10, 1999 - 07:41 am:

Hello? Any suggestions on other Web Art REsources?
MOWA is excellent! ARe there other Web Based Museums on line?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By amy on Friday, September 10, 1999 - 10:08 am:

If you haven't been to MUVA (Virtual Museum of Arts, El Pais) at http://www.diarioelpais.com/muva2/#, it's well worth a visit--or two. Both content and experience are top-notch!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page  By emitrov on Thursday, September 23, 1999 - 10:14 am:

Obsolescence is a category of the present, since every present (at least in our century) defines that portion of itself that is obsolete. It is the
space of everything that is contemporary and yet is over, terminated, discontinued.
this is my art work concerning obsolescence
of G.U.I. (graphical user interface).
http://www.clab.it/em/galleria/english/ere2.htm
please visit me
thanks


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